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Brian MacConaghy

Physicist IV

Email

brianm@apl.washington.edu

Phone

206-897-1869

Videos

PIXUL: PIXelated ULtrasound Speeds Disease Biomarker Search

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26 Apr 2018

Accurate assessment of chromatin modifications can be used to improve detection and treatment of various diseases. Further, accurate assessment of chromatin modifications can have an important role in designing new drug therapies. This novel technology applies miniature ultrasound transducers to shear chromatin in standard 96-well microplates. PIXUL saves researchers hours of sample preparation time and reduces sample degradation.

Non-invasive Treatment of Abscesses with Ultrasound

Abscesses are walled-off collections of fluid and bacteria within the body. They are common complications of surgery, trauma, and systemic infections. Typical treatment is the surgical placement of a drainage catheter to drain the abscess fluid over several days. Dr. Keith Chan and researchers at APL-UW's Center for Industrial + Medical Ultrasound are exploring how to treat abscesses non-invasively, that is, from outside the body, with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). This experimental therapy could reduce pain, radiation exposure, antibiotic use, and costs for patients with abscesses. Therapeutic ultrasound could also treat abscesses too small or inaccessible for conventional drainage.

20 Jun 2016

Flow Cytometry Techniques Advance Microbubble Science

Researchers at the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound (CIMU) are measuring the physical properties of ultrasound contrast agents — tiny gas bubbles several microns in diameter used to increase sonogram imaging efficiency in the body. When injected to the general circulation they can act as probes and beacons within the body, and can carry and deploy chemotherapeutic payloads.

CIMU researchers have developed a hybrid instrument that combines an off-the-shelf flow cytometer with an acoustic transducer. The cytometer's laser interrogation counts and measures the bubbles while the acoustic interrogation reveals the bubbles' viscosity and elasticity at megahertz frequencies.

5 Dec 2013

Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

Stress waves in model kidney stones exposed to burst wave lithotripsy

Maxwell, A., B. MacConaghy, M. Bailey, and O. Sapozhnikov, "Stress waves in model kidney stones exposed to burst wave lithotripsy," Proc., IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, 6-9 September, Washington, D.C., doi:10.1109/ULTSYM.2017.8092870 (IEEE, 2017).

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2 Nov 2017

Burst wave lithotripsy (BWL) is an experimental method to noninvasively fragment urinary calculi using low-frequency focused bursts of ultrasound. To optimize many of the acoustic parameters for this technology, it is necessary to understand the physical interactions between ultrasound bursts and stones. In this study, the interaction of elastic waves with model stones was simulated and experimentally visualized by photoelastography, a technique using polarized light to spatially and temporally visualize stress patterns.

Inactivation of planktonic Escherichia coli by focused 2-MHz ultrasound

Brayman, A.A., B.E. MacConaghy, Y.-N. Wang, K.T. Chan, W.L. Monsky, A.J. McClenny, and T.J. Matula, "Inactivation of planktonic Escherichia coli by focused 2-MHz ultrasound," Ultrasound Med. Biol., 43, 1476-1485, doi:10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2017.03.009, 2017.

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1 Jul 2017

This study was motivated by the desire to develop a non-invasive means to treat abscesses, and represents the first steps toward that goal. Non-thermal, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was used to inactivate Escherichia coli (~1 x 109

An ultrasonic caliper device for measuring acoustic nonlinearity

Hunter, C., O.A Sapozhnikov, A.D. Maxwell, V.A. Khokhlova, Y.-N. Wang, B. MacConaghy, and W. Kreider, "An ultrasonic caliper device for measuring acoustic nonlinearity," Phys. Procedia, 87, 93-98, doi:10.1016/j.phpro.2016.12.015, 2016.

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1 May 2016

In medical and industrial ultrasound, it is often necessary to measure the acoustic properties of a material. A specific medical application requires measurements of sound speed, attenuation, and nonlinearity to characterize livers being evaluated for transplantation. For this application, a transmission-mode caliper device is proposed in which both transmit and receive transducers are directly coupled to a test sample, the propagation distance is measured with an indicator gage, and receive waveforms are recorded for analysis. In this configuration, accurate measurements of nonlinearity present particular challenges: diffraction effects can be considerable while nonlinear distortions over short distances typically remain small. To enable simple estimates of the nonlinearity coeffcient from a quasi-linear approximation to the lossless Burgers’ equation, the calipers utilize a large transmitter and plane waves are measured at distances of 15–50 mm. Waves at 667 kHz and pressures between 0.1 and 1 MPa were generated and measured in water at different distances; the nonlinearity coeffcient of water was estimated from these measurements with a variability of approximately 10%. Ongoing efforts seek to test caliper performance in other media and improve accuracy via additional transducer calibrations.

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Inventions

Systems, Devices, and Methods for Separating, Concentrating, and/or Differentiating Between Cells from a Cell Sample

Embodiments are generally related to differentiating and/or separating portions of a sample that are of interest from the remainder of the sample. Embodiments may be directed towards separating cells of interest from a cell sample. In some embodiments, acoustic impedances of the cells of interest may be modified. For example, the acoustic properties of the cells of interest may be modified by attaching bubbles to the cells of interest. The cell sample may then be subjected to an acoustic wave. The cells of interest may be differentiated and/or separated from the remainder of the sample based on relative displacements and/or volumetric changes experienced by the cells of interest in response thereto. The cells of interest may be separated using a standing wave and sorted into separate channels of a flow cell. Optionally, the cells may be interrogated by a light source and differentiated by signals generated in response thereto.

Patent Number: 9,645,080

Tom Matula, Andrew Brayman, Oleg Sapozhnikov, Brian MacConaghy, Jarred Swalwell, Camilo Perez

Patent

9 May 2017

Systems, Devices, and Methods for Separating, Concentrating, and/or Differentiating Between Cells from a Cell Sample

Patent Number: 9,645,080

Tom Matula, Andrew Brayman, Oleg Sapozhnikov, Brian MacConaghy, Jarred Swalwell, Camilo Perez

More Info

Patent

9 May 2017

Embodiments are generally related to differentiating and/or separating portions of a sample that are of interest from the remainder of the sample. Embodiments may be directed towards separating cells of interest from a cell sample. In some embodiments, acoustic impedances of the cells of interest may be modified. For example, the acoustic properties of the cells of interest may be modified by attaching bubbles to the cells of interest. The cell sample may then be subjected to an acoustic wave. The cells of interest may be differentiated and/or separated from the remainder of the sample based on relative displacements and/or volumetric changes experienced by the cells of interest in response thereto. The cells of interest may be separated using a standing wave and sorted into separate channels of a flow cell. Optionally, the cells may be interrogated by a light source and differentiated by signals generated in response thereto.

System and Methods for Tracking Finger and Hand Movement Using Ultrasound

Record of Invention Number: 47931

John Kucewicz, Brian MacConaghy, Caren Marzban

Disclosure

10 Jan 2017

More Inventions

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
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