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Andrey Shcherbina

Principal Oceanographer

Affiliate Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Email

ashcherbina@apl.washington.edu

Phone

206-897-1446

Department Affiliation

Ocean Physics

Education

M.S. Physical Oceanography, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 1998

Ph.D. Physical Oceanography, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 2004

Andrey Shcherbina's Website

http://faculty.washington.edu/shcher/

Projects

Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study — SPURS

The NASA SPURS research effort is actively addressing the essential role of the ocean in the global water cycle by measuring salinity and accumulating other data to improve our basic understanding of the ocean's water cycle and its ties to climate.

15 Apr 2015

Lateral Mixing

Small scale eddies and internal waves in the ocean mix water masses laterally, as well as vertically. This multi-investigator project aims to study the physics of this mixing by combining dye dispersion studies with detailed measurements of the velocity, temperature and salinity field during field experiments in 2011 and 2012.

1 Sep 2012

APL-UW Involvement in the Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction Science and Technology Center (CMOP)

AUVs will be deployed by a newly formed APL-UW AUV group as part of CMOP's experimental observation network which consists of multiple fixed and mobile platforms equipped with oceanographic sensors.

More Info

15 Jun 2012

The Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Predication (CMOP) has purchased from Hydroid, LLC two Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) for its studies. The REMUS (Remote Environmental Measuring Units) 100 (see Figure 1) is a compact, light-weight, AUV designed for operation in coastal environments up to 100 meters in depth. The AUVs will be deployed by a newly formed APL-UW AUV group as part of CMOP's experimental observation network which consists of multiple fixed and mobile platforms equipped with oceanographic sensors. The AUVs will be used, primarily, to study the Columbia River plume and estuary region. The AUVs will be deployed periodically throughout each operational year. We also plan to allow customization of the AUVs by integrating novel biogeochemical sensors to meet specific scientific objectives for the CMOP program.

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Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

Autonomous multi-platform observations during the Salinity Processes in the Upper-ocean Regional Study

Lindstrom, E.J., A.Y. Shcherbina, L. Rainville, J.T. Farrar, L.R. Centurioni, S. Dong, E.A. D’Asaro, C. Eriksen, D.M. Fratantoni, B.A. Hodges, V. Hormann, W.S. Kessler, C.M. Lee, S.C. Riser, L. St. Laurent, and D.L. Volkov, "Autonomous multi-platform observations during the Salinity Processes in the Upper-ocean Regional Study," Oceanography, 38-48, doi:, 2017.

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1 Jun 2017

The Salinity Processes in the Upper-ocean Regional Study (SPURS) aims to understand the patterns and variability of sea surface salinity. In order to capture the wide range of spatial and temporal scales associated with processes controlling salinity in the upper ocean, research vessels delivered autonomous instruments to remote sites, one in the North Atlantic and one in the Eastern Pacific. Instruments sampled for one complete annual cycle at each of these two sites, which are subject to contrasting atmospheric forcing. The SPURS field programs coordinated sampling from many different platforms, using a mix of Lagrangian and Eulerian approaches. This article discusses the motivations, implementation, and first results of the SPURS-1 and SPURS-2 programs.

Northern Arabian Sea Circulation-Autonomous Research (NASCar): A research initiative based on autonomous sensors

Centurioni, L.R., and 33 others, including R.R. Harcourt, C.M. Lee, L. Rainville, and A.Y. Shcherbina, "Northern Arabian Sea Circulation-Autonomous Research (NASCar): A research initiative based on autonomous sensors," Oceanography, 30, 74-87, doi:10.5670/oceanog.2017.224, 2017.

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1 Jun 2017

The Arabian Sea circulation is forced by strong monsoonal winds and is characterized by vigorous seasonally reversing currents, extreme differences in sea surface salinity, localized substantial upwelling, and widespread submesoscale thermohaline structures. Its complicated sea surface temperature patterns are important for the onset and evolution of the Asian monsoon. This article describes a program that aims to elucidate the role of upper-ocean processes and atmospheric feedbacks in setting the sea surface temperature properties of the region. The wide range of spatial and temporal scales and the difficulty of accessing much of the region with ships due to piracy motivated a novel approach based on state-of-the-art autonomous ocean sensors and platforms. The extensive data set that is being collected, combined with numerical models and remote sensing data, confirms the role of planetary waves in the reversal of the Somali Current system. These data also document the fast response of the upper equatorial ocean to monsoon winds through changes in temperature and salinity and the connectivity of the surface currents across the northern Indian Ocean. New observations of thermohaline interleaving structures and mixing in setting the surface temperature properties of the northern Arabian Sea are also discussed.

Optimal planning and sampling predictions for autonomous Lagrangian platforms and sensors in the northern Arabian Sea

Lermusiaux, P.F.J., and 12 others, including A.Y. Shcherbina and C.M. Lee, "Optimal planning and sampling predictions for autonomous Lagrangian platforms and sensors in the northern Arabian Sea," Oceanography, 30, 172-185, doi:10.5670/oceanog.2017.242, 2017.

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1 Jun 2017

Where, when, and what to sample, and how to optimally reach the sampling locations, are critical questions to be answered by autonomous and Lagrangian platforms and sensors. For a reproducible scientific sampling approach, answers should be quantitative and provided using fundamental principles. This article reviews concepts and recent progress toward this principled approach, focusing on reachability, path planning, and adaptive sampling, and presents results of a real-time forecasting and planning experiment completed during February–April 2017 for the Northern Arabian Sea Circulation-autonomous research program. The predictive skill, layered fields, and uncertainty estimates obtained using the MIT MSEAS multi-resolution ensemble ocean modeling system are first studied. With such inputs, deterministic and probabilistic three-dimensional reachability forecasts issued daily for gliders and floats are then showcased and validated. Finally, a Bayesian adaptive sampling framework is shown to forecast in real time the observations that are most informative for estimating classic ocean fields and also secondary variables such as Lagrangian coherent structures.

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Inventions

Open Water Detection from Beneath Sea Ice

Record of Invention Number: 47655

Eric D'Asaro, Andrey Shcherbina

Disclosure

16 Mar 2016

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
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