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Kate Stafford

Principal Oceanographer

Affiliate Associate Professor, Oceanography

Email

stafford@apl.washington.edu

Phone

206-685-8617

Department Affiliation

Acoustics

Publications

2000-present and while at APL-UW

Near real-time underwater passive acoustic monitoring of natural and anthropogenic sounds

Baumgartner, M., K.M. Stafford, and G. Latha, "Near real-time underwater passive acoustic monitoring of natural and anthropogenic sounds," Observing the Oceans in Real Time, R. Venkatesan, A. Tandon, E.A. D'Asaro, and M.A. Atmanand, eds., 203-226 (Singer, 2018).

1 Jan 2018

Occasional acoustic presence of Antarctic blue whales on a feeding ground in southern Chile

Buchan, S.J., R. Hucke-Gaete, K.M. Stafford, and C.W. Clark, "Occasional acoustic presence of Antarctic blue whales on a feeding ground in southern Chile," Mar. Mammal Sci., EOR, doi:10.1111/mms/12441, 2017.

23 Nov 2017

Spatial and temporal trends in fin whale vocalizations recorded in the NE Pacific Ocean between 2003–2013

Weirathmueller, M.J., K.M. Stafford, W.S.D. Wilcock, R.S. Hilmo, R.P. Dziak, and A.M. Tréhu, "Spatial and temporal trends in fin whale vocalizations recorded in the NE Pacific Ocean between 2003–2013," Plos One, 12, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0186127, 2017.

More Info

26 Oct 2017

In order to study the long-term stability of fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) singing behavior, the frequency and inter-pulse interval of fin whale 20 Hz vocalizations were observed over 10 years from 2003–2013 from bottom mounted hydrophones and seismometers in the northeast Pacific Ocean. The instrument locations extended from 40°N to 48°N and 130°W to 125°W with water depths ranging from 1500–4000 m. The inter-pulse interval (IPI) of fin whale song sequences was observed to increase at a rate of 0.54 seconds/year over the decade of observation. During the same time period, peak frequency decreased at a rate of 0.17 Hz/year. Two primary call patterns were observed. During the earlier years, the more commonly observed pattern had a single frequency and single IPI. In later years, a doublet pattern emerged, with two dominant frequencies and IPIs. Many call sequences in the intervening years appeared to represent a transitional state between the two patterns. The overall trend was consistent across the entire geographical span, although some regional differences exist. Understanding changes in acoustic behavior over long time periods is needed to help establish whether acoustic characteristics can be used to help determine population identity in a widely distributed, difficult to study species such as the fin whale.

More Publications

In The News

Researcher listens to learn about ocean's health

KCAW Radio (Sitka, AK), Katherine Rose

Whale watching is a popular pastime in Alaska, but what about whale listening? Dr. Kate Stafford does it for a living. She’s been in Sitka this November for the Science in Residency Fellowship, and on a winter day recently she took a group out on the water to try to capture some sounds, and songs, from some of Sitka’s most vocal creatures. (Photo: Angie Bowers)

1 Dec 2017

Arctic ballad

The Planet Magazine, Keiko Betcher

Seattle scientist Kate Stafford listens to whale songs to measure how melting sea ice affects mammals in the Arctic.

16 Mar 2017

Arctic sea ice loss impacts beluga whale migration

UW News and Information, Michelle Ma

The annual migration of some beluga whales in Alaska is altered by sea ice changes in the Arctic, while other belugas do not appear to be affected.

5 Jan 2017

More News Items

Acoustics Air-Sea Interaction & Remote Sensing Center for Environmental & Information Systems Center for Industrial & Medical Ultrasound Electronic & Photonic Systems Ocean Engineering Ocean Physics Polar Science Center
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